CYDC nominated for CMHA mental health award

By: Gerry Rucchin
May 9, 2019

Professor Colin King, centre, student clinicians, Child and Youth Development Clinic Staff and guests at the Champion of Mental Health Award breakfast.

Professor Colin King, centre, student clinicians, Child and Youth Development Clinic Staff and guests at the Champion of Mental Health Award breakfast.

Making an immediate impact in London and surrounding area.

In just over 18 months of operation, the Child and Youth Development Clinic’s (CYDC) work has been recognized by the mental health community. The CYDC has been nominated for the prestigious Champion of Mental Health Award.

Professor Colin King, Director of the Child and Youth Development Clinic, represented the CYDC during the award ceremony at the London Convention Centre.

“It was an honour for our team to be nominated.  When you look at the initiatives and leadership among the group of nominees, it was a privilege to be included with other individuals and organizations who are making a tremendous impact to improve mental health in London,” said King.

The Canadian Mental Health Association (CMHA) Middlesex branch honours one individual and one organization in London-Middlesex who have reduced stigma associated with mental illness, provided support or treatment to people with mental illnesses, advocated for mental health issues and advanced knowledge in the area of mental health/health research.

The CYDC provides consultation, assessment, and intervention services from graduate student clinicians in psychology, speech and language, and social work to children and youth from three to 18 years of age. Graduate students in School and Applied Child Psychology, Clinical Psychology, Counselling Psychology, Social Work, and Speech and Language Pathology programs at Western can participate at the clinic.

The clinic offers a sliding scale of fees that are based on a family’s financial need. Clinic staff work collaboratively with families to determine a fee schedule that the family can afford. No one has been turned away due to financial hardship.

“For those families who are struggling and seeking mental health services, the CYDC is filling that gap,” said nominator and Director of Community Engagement for the Faculty of Education, Rosie Triebner. “And its providing direct access for all families – that’s so important.”

The London and Middlesex communities have embraced the clinic. CYDC has joined forces with schools, school boards and community organizations.

“It takes a village to support a child or youth who is struggling with their mental health.  We need collaboration and coordinated care across settings and it has been exciting to see how we can be more effective and impactful by working together,” said King.

Since it opened in October 2017, more than 500 families have been referred to the clinic. Half of them received a discount on services due to financial need.

Read more about the Child and Youth Development Clinic.