Dr Katina Pollock

Professor

Academic Coordinator, Education Doctorate Program

University Research Board Member

Past Co-Director, Knowledge Network for Applied Education Research, Secretariat

Past Director, Western's Centre for Education Leadership

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I am a Professor of Educational Leadership and Policy at the Faculty of Education, Western University. The overall goal of my research agenda is to support and improve public education systems; to this effect, my research focuses on supporting school leaders. Specifically, I focus on school leaders’ work intensification and well-being, policy development and implementation, and the mobilization of knowledge.

I am also the Academic Coordinator of Western University's 2022/2023 Doctor of Education program, I hold elected membership on the University Research Board (2022-2024), and I supervise graduate students’ research on education leaders’ practices and well-being. Past leadership roles I have held are: Co-Director of the Knowledge Network for Applied Education Research (KNAER) (2010-2019), Director of the Western Centre for Education Leadership (2014–2018), and Co-Director of the UCEA Centre for International Study of School Leadership (2011-2014).

 


Research Highlights

Thus far, I have completed three provincial studies, funded by the Ontario Principal's Council (OPC), that explored principals’ (2014) and vice-principals’ (2016) work. As well, I completed  a study about French and French Catholic principals’ work in Ontario (2019). My research has also been supported by the Ontario provincial government (2011–2014). In 2018, I studied the work of principals in relation to the Ontario Leadership Framework. My research findings can be found in the research project page of my website, and all of my publications are included in the publications page. 

Funding & Grants
As a scholar in leadership and policy, I have received several research grants and contracts from a number of funding organizations, including the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC). My SSHRC Insight Development Grant (2013–2016) explored the contemporary work of secondary school principals. My subsequent SSHRC Insight Grants have focused on secondary school principals’ work intensification (2016–2021) and the relationship of policy and principals’ work (2015–2023). In addition to federal research funding, I also work closely with several professional organizations, such as the Ontario Principals’ Council (OPC) and the Association des Directions et Directions Adjointes des Ecoles Franco-Ontariennes (ADFO).

Expertise Areas

Research

Examining Local Democratic Voice in K–12 System-Level Decision-Making (2021-2023)

Funded by: Canadian School Boards Association (CSBA)

This comparative case study focuses specifically on school board governance. It explores participation of “local community voice” (with emphasis on diversity) in Canadian jurisdictions that have/had democratically elected school boards compared with those where schools are governed centrally. We examine six sites: British Columbia, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Nova Scotia, Québec, and the Northwest Territories. The study (a) describes stakeholders’ experiences (or lack thereof) with democratic voices within school systems at each research site, (b) explores the challenges experienced by key stakeholders when having (or attempting to have) a voice in decision-making at the school system level and, if present, (c) reports the various strategies stakeholders have used to overcome the challenges identified to have a democratic voice with the selected jurisdictions. My team will present evidence-informed recommendations to the Canadian School Board Association in the form of a policy scan and a final report due March 2023.

Trauma-Sensitive School Leadership Study Report: Survey Data Analysis and Recommendations (2022)

Funded by: Ontario Principals’ Council (OPC)

Trauma-sensitive education has been promoted both as a powerful tool that educators can use to more effectively support at-risk students, as well as a comprehensive approach to further developing student resilience. The COVID-19 pandemic increased awareness throughout the educator sector about the need for trauma-sensitive schooling. In response, the Ontario Principals’ Council created an ad hoc committee consisting of Dr. Nadine Trepanier-Bison, Dr. David Tranter, Dr. Katina Pollock, Dr. Charis Newton-Thompson, Vicki Shannon, Irfan Toor, Patsy Agard, Lorne Gretsinger, and Noah Goslin to (a) conduct a study on the experiences, challenges, and opportunities of Ontario school administrators when leading a trauma-sensitive approach to education; (b) write a study report summarizing their findings; and (c) to make recommendations for various stakeholders. In all, 652 school administrators (of 5,400 OPC Members) completed the survey. Just over half (54.1%) of the survey respondents were elementary principals, 18.1% were elementary vice-principals, 10.8% were secondary principals, and 12.4% were secondary vice-principals. The remaining respondents served different administrative roles, including system principals, acting principals, and retired principals. In all, 25 school boards across the province were represented, including larger urban boards, such as the York Region District School Board, as well as smaller, rural, and northern boards, such as the Rainy River District School Board. The recommendations in the report are designed to help different stakeholders in the education system, including the government, school boards, principal associations, principals, and vice-principals, effectively and efficiently to develop trauma-sensitive schools. The executive summary and full report are below.

The Intensification of Secondary School Principals' Work (2016-2021)

Funded by: Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC)

School principals' work is intensifying, threatening principal recruitment, retention, and job performance. This is particularly true for secondary school principals who have to work with high workload, inadequate resources, and an increasing number of government regulations. The intensity and complexity are also manifested in the work of principals in Ontario and British Columbia where the contexts of their work share more in common than other regions of Canada. This five-year study aims to provide an in-depth examination of secondary school principals' work intensification in both provinces, and to understand why work intensification is emerging in the secondary principal workforce, how this work intensification is manifesting itself, and how principals are acting in response to the resulting challenges. The mixed methods study involves focus groups and 50 exploratory interviews at the first stage. Findings from the interviews, focus groups, and relevant literature will be used to create an online survey to solicit secondary school principal perceptions for each jurisdiction in a larger scale. Four follow-up case studies will be conducted, observing principals and documenting activities that contribute to their work intensification. This study will generate knowledge critical to principal training, recruitment, and professional development and build understanding from the education and labour fields to address issues in principals' work.

 

Principals’ Work in Ontario’s French-Language Education Systems (2018-2019)

Le travail des directions d’école au sein des systèmes d’éducation de langue française en Ontario (2018-2019)

Funded by: Association des directions et directions adjointes des écoles franco-ontariennes (ADFO)

In 2018, the Association des directions et directions adjointes des écoles franco-ontariennes (ADFO) commissioned I, Dr. Wang, and our research team to conduct a study on the changing nature of principals’ work in French public and French Catholic school systems. This report, ADFO Principals’ Work, delineates what French and French Catholic principals do and the motives behind their actions. The report captures principals’ responses to a quantitative survey specific to their understanding of how they approach their work, spend their time, and the motives and factors that influence the choices they make. It also provides details about the challenges and possibilities French public and French Catholic principals work present and the implications of their work-related challenges on their health and well-being. The report is intended to stimulate conversation among all stakeholders including school and system leaders, policy makers, and researchers. The document further serves as a guide for supporting professional associations. This work may be cited as: Association des directions et directions adjointes des écoles franco-ontariennes. (ADFO). (2019). ADFO Principals Work. Toronto: ON.

En 2018, l’Association des directions et directions adjointes des écoles franco-ontariennes (ADFO) m’a chargée, ainsi que Fei Wang (UBC) et notre équipe de recherche de mener une étude sur la nature changeante du travail des directions d’école au sein des systèmes d’éducation de langue française en Ontario. Ce rapport, Le travail des directions d’école au sein des systèmes d’éducation de langue française en Ontario, décrit ce que les directions d’école de langue française font et les motivations derrière leurs actions. Ce rapport capture les réponses des directions d’école à notre sondage quantitatif qui posait des questions spécifiques sur leur compréhension des manières dont elles abordent leur travail, dont elles passent leur temps, et sur les motivations et facteurs qui influencent leurs choix. Le rapport fournit aussi des détails sur les défis et possibilités inhérents à leur travail et les conséquences que ces défis reliés au travail ont sur leur santé et leur bien-être. Ce rapport a pour objectif d’encourager le dialogue chez les partenaires en éducation, y compris les leaders du système scolaire et des écoles, les responsables de l’élaboration des politiques et les chercheuses et chercheurs. Ce travail peut être cité de la manière suivante : POLLOCK, K., et WANG, F. Le travail des directions d’école au sein des systèmes d’éducation de langue française en Ontario. Toronto, ON: Association des directions et directions adjointes des écoles franco-ontariennes (ADFO), 2019.

 

Revision of the Ontario Leadership Framework (2017–2018)

This project included a contractual Agreement for “Research Services to update/revise all four components of the Ontario Leadership Framework (OLF) 2013” between the Ministry of Education and Western University, Faculty of Education. I was tasked to lead a multi-disciplinary and ethno-racially diverse team representing a research institution that would additionally partner with other education associations, individual researchers, school districts, and community partners within and outside of the education sector, to update/revise all four components of the Ontario Leadership Framework (OLF) (2013)1. Below are the researchers and stakeholders who came together to fulfill this contract.

Western Centre Directors and Members

  • Dr. Claire Crooks, Director, Centre for School Mental Health
  • Dr. Brent Debassige, Director, Indigenous Office
  • Dr. Susan Rodger, Member, Centre for School Mental Health
  • Dr. Jacqueline Specht, Director, The Canadian Research Centre on Inclusive Education
  • Mr. William (Bill) Tucker, Co-Director, Western Centre for Education Leadership

Expert Research Advisor Team (10 members)

  • Dr. Denise Armstrong, Brock University
  • Dr. Carol Campbell, OISE/UT
  • Dr. Jean Clinton, McMaster University
  • Dr. Joe Flessa, OISE/UT
  • Dr. Carl James, York University
  • Dr. Sylvie Lamoureaux, University of Ottawa
  • Dr. John Portelli, OISE/UT
  • Dr. Jean-Paul Restoule, University of Victoria
  • Dr. Jose Weinstein, Universidad Diego Portales
  • Dr. James Ryan, OISE/UT

Practitioner Advisors and Community Connectors (Total 16)

  • Dr. Carlana Lindeman, Independent
  • Catholic Principals’ Council of Ontario (CPCO)
  • The Learning Partnership
  • Huron-Perth Catholic District School Board (Dr. Vince MacDonald, Director)
  • Ontario Catholic Supervisory Officers’ Association
  • Ontario Principals’ Council (OPC)
  • People for Education
  • Public Council of Ontario Directors of Education (PCODE)/ Ontario Public Supervisory Officers’ Association (OPSOA)
  • Renfrew County District School Board (Pino Buffone, Director)
  • Association des directions et directions adjointes des école franco-ontariennes (ADFO)
  • Ontario Catholic School Trustees Association (OCSTA)
  • Ontario Association of School Business Officials (OASBO)
  • Facing History and Ourselves
  • Ontario Alliance of Black School Educators
  • Indigenous Educators Network (OISE)

The project was to specifically update/revise all four components of the Ontario Leadership Framework (OLF) (2013); the District Effectiveness Framework, the System-level Leadership document, the K-12 School Effectiveness Framework, the K-12 School Level Leadership document, as well as the Personal Leadership Resources. I along with the involved stakeholders, identified and integrated additional evidence-informed school and school system practices based on key developments to emphasize the importance of human rights and equity in learning and well-being, as they apply to each of the nine existing characteristics of strong school districts in the current District Effectiveness Framework, the nine existing domains and dimensions in the current K–12 System-level Leadership practices, and the components and indicators of the K–12 School Effectiveness Framework (2013) and the six existing domains and dimension of the current K–12 School-level Leadership practices and the overall Personal Leadership Resources. Because Ministry feedback and sector consultation indicated a growing acknowledgement of the importance of the personal leadership resources (PLRs), recommendations for these were included as a separate section in the final report of recommendations. In total, a 453-page final report was submitted to the Ontario provincial government in May 2018.

 

The Changing Nature of Vice-Principals' Work (2015-June 2017)

Funded by: Ontario Principals' Council (OPC)

The study is in response to the call to extend the study on principals' work to that of vice-principals' work. With the ultimate goal of providing a more accurate picture of contemporary vice-principals' work, this study explores what vice-principals do and the motives behind their actions. The study examines how vice-principals approach their work, record how vice-principals spend their time, explore the motives and external factors influencing their actions and behaviours, and describe the challenges and possibilities their work presents to them. Data collection methods will include focus groups and a large-scale online survey. The survey consists of 12 sections: how you spend your time, duties and responsibilities, accountability and external influences, challenges and possibilities, work and life balance, well-being and job satisfaction, supports, the Ontario Leadership Framework, professional development, partnerships, about yourself, and about your school. It is anticipated that the online survey will take approximately 45 minutes to complete and will be launched in Winter 2016.

 

Suspension/Expulsion Program Evaluation (2015-2016)

Funded by: Safe Schools Unit/Ontario Ministry of Education

The evaluation study was designed to better understand suspension and expulsion program implementation and determine the effectiveness or impact of programming and prevention activities. The evaluation also gathered general information from a selection of boards regarding suspension/expulsion and includes a review of the services provided through funding related to the Ontario Grants for Student Needs (GSN).

The findings of the evaluation study indicate that program implementation, effectiveness, and available resources vary across school boards, especially related to school board size. Smaller school boards reported less than adequate resources for programming, while larger school boards reported adequate program resources, and higher rates suspension and expulsion were seen in smaller school boards. Rates of suspension and expulsion also differed across student race, gender, socio-economic status, and mental health and wellbeing. Findings indicate that suspension and expulsions programs, in conjunction with other academic and non-academic programming, can be effective for some students in some circumstances.

The formative evaluation design was conducted over two phases and incorporated both qualitative and quantitative research methods. Phase one involved conducting a literature review and inter-jurisdictional scan as well as an online survey of all teachers and paraprofessional staff (e.g., social workers, child and youth workers, psychologists, attendance counsellors and educational assistants) directly involved in suspension and expulsion programming or prevention activities (interjurisdictional scan available below). Phase one of the evaluation also included an integration of statistical analyses conducted internally by the Ministry of Education. Phase one of the evaluation occurred from June 2015 to June 2016.

Phase two of this evaluation was conducted with a sample of eight school boards across Ontario. To achieve an accurate representation of suspension and expulsion policies and programs across Ontario, the phase two sample included a mix of English, French, Catholic and Public school boards, as well as school boards located in different regions of the province. Data collection methods for phase two consisted of document analyses, as well as interviews with directors and senior administrators, principals and vice-principals, students, and parents/guardians at each of the eight participating school boards in the sample. Phase two of this evaluation occurred between October and November, 2016.

This interjurisdictional scan provides an overview of the various suspension/expulsion policies, programs and reporting mechanisms in place across Canada's 13 provinces and territories. The inter jurisdictional scan also covers whether academic/non-academic support is offered to suspended/expelled students and, where available, details research/evaluation findings related to the various programmatic approaches. Data reported in this inter jurisdictional scan was gathered from the organizational websites for each K-12 Ministry/Department of Education across Canada.

 

Policy Layer Enactment: New Terrains of Understanding (2015-2020)

Funded by: Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC)

This SSHRC funded study explores the complexities of policy layer enactment in Ontario secondary schools. Findings shed new light on how policy is interpreted, prioritized and "done" in real-world contexts. Relatively few policy studies investigate the enactment of multiple policies at the same time despite criticisms that single-policy research fails to capture actors' holistic experiences in managing multiple, competing policy demands. Yet, understanding how the layers operate addresses essential questions about what occurs in schools. This research is a case study guided methodologically by established qualitative methods from policy sociology, and augmented with post-qualitative methods.

 

The Contemporary Work of Secondary School Principals (2013-2015)

Funded by: Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC) Insight Development Grant

This study builds on my previous research, except I narrow in on the work of secondary school principals examine how they understand and approach their work. This study employs a mixed-methods design. Currently 15 out of 30 secondary school principals have been interviewed and two case studies are in progress. The case studies consist of observations of two secondary school principals throughout a school year.

 

Specialist Teachers: A Review of the Literature (2015)

Funded by: Elementary Teachers' Federation of Ontario (ETFO)

This literature review examines the connection between specialist teachers and student achievement, with a specific focus on teachers at the elementary school level and in the context of Ontario, Canada. Specialist teachers can be found in a wide range of subject areas, however, a fully encompassing definition of a specialist teacher remains somewhat elusive and must be considered in relation to factors such as formal qualifications, experience and local context. Overall, the literature on the subject remains rather limited, with few casual studies examining direct links between specialist teachers and student outcomes. However, the literature appears to support the claim that specialist teachers can positively impact student achievement and contribute to student success at the elementary level.

Findings: Full report available here

 

Principals’ Work in Contemporary Times (2011-2014)

Funded by: Leadership Development and School Board Governance Branch, Ontario Ministry of Education & the Western Academic Development Fund

This study was designed to examine how principals approach their work, spend their time, and the motivation and forces that influence their choices. It also describes the challenges and possibilities inherent in the work of contemporary principals. This research was guided by both the Ontario Leadership Framework (OLF) and the concept of work. This inquiry included interviews and school-site observations. One- to two-hour interviews were conducted with 70 school principals who were employed in seven district school boards across southwestern Ontario. School-site observations encompassed three full work days with six principals in five different district school boards.

 

The Changing Nature of Principals’ Work (2012-2013)

Funded by: Ontario Principals’ Council (OPC)

This study examined the changing nature of principals’ work. It seeks to provide a more accurate picture of what principals do on a daily basis, and the challenges and possibilities inherent in their work. Data collection was carried out using a mixed methods design that included focus groups and an online survey. The online survey included 60 questions that touched on a number of aspects of principals’ work. A total of 1,821 OPC members responded to the survey when it was active for 26 days in October, 2013. In total, 1,423 surveys were available for analysis providing a response rate of 52.68%. The sample is largely consistent with that of the larger principal population in Ontario.

 

Occasional Teachers’ Access to Professional Learning (2010-2011)

Funded by: Elementary Teachers' Federation of Ontario (ETFO)

The purpose of the study was to explore how occasional teachers engaged in professional learning. More specifically, it sought to examine the strategies occasional teachers used to participate in professional learning and the challenges occasional teachers experienced when attempting to engage in professional learning. This study employed mixed methods: 8 focus group sessions across the province of Ontario and an online survey. 440 survey links were requested and sent out to potential participants; 371 surveys were actually completed.

In The News

Recent Publications

Books

Lee, M., Pollock, K., & Tulowitzki, P. (Eds.) (2021). How school principals use their time: Implications for school improvement, administration, and leadership. Routledge.

Leithwood, K., Sun, J., & Pollock, K. (Eds.). (2017). How school leaders contribute to student success. Cham, SUI: Springer Nature.

Johnston, J., Myers, J., Pollock, K., & Zoet, C. (2008). I am the teacher: Effective classroom management for occasional teachers. Toronto, ON: Elementary Teachers’ Federation of Ontario.

Clark, R., Antonelli, F., Lacavera, D., Livingstone, D., Pollock, K., Smaller, H., Strachan, J., & Tarc, P. (2007). Beyond PD days: Teachers’ work and learning in Canada. Toronto, ON: Centre for the Study of Education and Work & the Ontario Teachers’ Federation.

Special Journal Issues Edited

Pollock, K., & Campbell, C. (Eds.) (2021). Developing professional capital through systems approaches to evidence-informed policy and practice [Special issue]. Journal of Professional Capital and Community, 6(1).

Pollock, K., Wang, F. and Mahfouz, J. (2020), School administrators’ well-being and mindfulness: three tensions. Journal of Educational Administration, Vol. 58 No. 4, pp. 389-399. https://doi.org/10.1108/JEA-08-2020-237

Pollock, K. (2016, December). The changing nature of school principals’ work: An international perspective. International Studies in Educational Administration, 44(3).

Pollock, K. (2016, October). The changing nature of school principals’ work: An international perspective. International Studies in Educational Administration, 44(2).

Pollock, K., & Murakami, E. (2014, June). School leadership: Opportunities for comparative inquiry.Canadian and International Education, 43(1).

Pollock, K., & Ryan, J. (Eds.) (2013, May). Problems of practice: Canadian cases in educational leadership and policy [Special issue]. Canadian Journal for Educational Administration and Policy, 142.

Academic Articles

Wang, F., Pollock, K., & Hauseman, C. (2022). Time demands and emotionally draining situations amid work intensification of school principals. Educational Administration Quarterlyx(x),  https://doi.org/10.1177/0013161X221132837

Wang, F., Pollock, K., & Hauseman, C. (2021). Complexity and volume: Work intensification of vice-principals in Ontario. International Journal of Leadership in Education, x(x), https://doi.org/10.1080/13603124.2021.1974097

Wang, F., Hauseman, C., & Pollock, K. (2021). "I am here for the students": Principals' perception of accountability amid work intensificationEducational Assessment, Evaluation and Accountability. x(x) https://doi.org/10.1007/s11092-021-09368-6 

Pollock, K., & Campbell, C. (2021). Guest editorial: Developing professional capital through systems approaches to evidence-informed policy and practice. Journal of Professional Capital and Community, 6(1), 1–6.

Pollock, K. (2020). School leaders’ work during the COVID-19 pandemic: A two-pronged approach. International Studies in Educational Administration, 48(3), 38–45.

Pollock, K., Wang, F. and Mahfouz, J. (2020), School administrators’ well-being and mindfulness: Three tensions, Journal of Educational Administration, 58(4), 389-399.

Lim, L. & Pollock, K. (2019). Secondary principals’ perspectives on the impact of work intensification on the secondary vice-principal role. Leading and Managing, 25(2), 80-98.

Pollock, K. & Briscoe, P. (2019). School principals' understandings of student difference and diversity and how it influences their work. International Journal of Educational Management. DOI: 10.1108/IJEM-07-2019-0243

Faubert, B., Pollock, K., Hauseman, C. (2019). Superintendents' work (intensification) in a shifting policy climate: Enacting a student discipline strategy. Canadian Journal of Educational Administration and Policy, 190, 49-56.

Pollock, K., Wang, F., Hauseman, C. (2019). Proactively mitigating school leaders’ emotionally draining situations.Canadian Journal of Educational Administration and Policy, 190, 40–48.

Wang, F., Pollock, K., & Hauseman, C. (2018). School principals’ job satisfaction: The effects of work intensification. Canadian Journal of Educational Administration and Policy, 185, 73–90.

Pollock, K., & Hauseman, D. C. (2018). The use of e-mail and principals’ work: A double-edged sword. Leadership and Policy in Schools, 1–12 doi: 10.1080/15700763.2017.1398338

Hauseman, D. C., Pollock, K., & Wang, F. (2017). Inconvenient, but essential: Impact and influence of school-community involvement on principals' work and workload. School Community Journal, 27(1), 83–106.

Campbell, C., Pollock, K., Briscoe, P., Carr-Harris, S., & Tuters, S. (2017). Developing a knowledge network for applied education research to mobilise evidence in and for educational practice. Educational Research, 59(2), 209–227. doi: 10.1080/00131881.2017.1310364

Pollock, K. (2016). Principals’ work in Ontario, Canada: Changing demographics, advancements in informational communication technology and health and well-being.Journal of the Commonwealth Council for Educational Administration & Management, 44(3), 55–74.

Pollock, K., & Winton, S. (2016). Juggling multiple accountability systems: How three principals manage these tensions in Ontario, Canada. Educational Assessment, Evaluation and Accountability, 28(4), 323–345. doi:10.1007/s11092-015-9224-7.

Briscoe, P., Pollock, K., Campbell, C., & Carr-Harris, Shasta. (2015). Finding the sweet spot: Network structures and processes for increased knowledge mobilization. Brock Education Journal, 25(1), 20–34. doi: 10.26522/BROCKED.V25I1.432

Pollock, K., Murakami, E., & Swapp, D. H. (2015). The work of school leaders: North American similarities, local differences.International Studies in Educational Administration, 43(2), 5-20. http://www.cceam.org/fileadmin/user_upload/ISEA_MEM/ISEA43.2.pdf 

Pollock, K., Wang, F., & Hauseman, D. C. (2015). Complexity and volume: An inquiry into factors that drive principals' work. Societies, 5(2), 537–565. doi:10.3390/soc5020537

Winton, S., & Pollock, K. (2015). Meanings of success and successful leadership in Ontario, Canada, in neo-liberal times. Journal of Educational Administration and History, 48(1), 19–34. doi:10.1080/00220620.2015.1040378

Pollock, K., Wang, F., & Hauseman, D. C. (2014). The changing nature of principals’ work: Final report. Retrieved from the Ontario Principals’ Council.

Murakami, E., Törnsén, M., & Pollock, K. (2014). School principals’ standards and expectations in three educational contexts. Canadian and International Education, 43(2), 1–18.

Livingstone, D., Pollock, K., & Raykov, M. (2014). Family binds and glass ceilings and time binds: Women managers’ mobility limits in a ‘knowledge economy’. Critical Sociology, 42(1), 145–166. doi:10.1177/0896920514532663.

Pollock, K. (2013). Administrator and teachers' perceptions of school success in a publicly-funded Catholic school in Ontario, Canada. Catholic Education: A Journal of Inquiry and Practice, 16(2), 313–338. doi: 10.15365/joce.1602052013

Pollock, K., Lopez, A., & Joshee, R. (2013). Disrupting myths of poverty in the face of resistance.Journal of Cases in Educational Administration, 16(2), 11–19. doi:10.1177/1555458913487031

Winton, S., & Pollock, K. (2013). Preparing politically savvy principals in Ontario, Canada. Journal of Education Administration, 51(1), 40–54. doi:10.1108/09578231311291422

Pollock, K. (2012). Access, engagement, and community connections. Teaching and Learning, 7(2), 1–15. doi: 10.26522/TL.V7I2.414

Pearce, J., & Pollock, K. (2012). Informal learning and volunteering: The case of an unemployed certified teacher in Ontario.Learning Landscapes, 5(2), 237–281.

Pollock, K., & Winton, S. (2012). School improvement: A case of competing priorities!Journal of Cases in Educational Leadership, 15(3), 11–21. doi: 10.1177/1555458912447840

Winton, S., & Pollock, K. (2011). Teaching policy by collaborating across borders. Academic Exchange Quarterly, 15(4), 143–148.

Pollock, K., & Winton, S. (2011). Hybrid courses and online policy dialogue: A transborder distance learning collaboration.The Canadian Journal for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning, 2(1), 1–12. doi: 10.5206/cjsotl-rcacea.2011.1.7
Retrieved from http://ir.lib.uwo.ca/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1035&context=cjsotl_rcacea

Hibbert, K., Stooke, R., Pollock, K., Faez, F., Namukasa, I., & O’Sullivan, J. (2010). The “Ten-year road”: Joys and challenges on the road to tenure.Journal of Educational Thought: Special Issue: Perspectives – The Road to Tenure, 44(1), 69–84. 

Pollock, K. (2010, February). Marginalization and the occasional teacher workforce: The case of internationally educated teachers (IETs).Canadian Journal for Educational Administration and Policy: Special Issue, 100. Retrieved from http://www.umanitoba.ca/publications/cjeap/articles/pollock-iet.html

Pollock, K. (2011). Book Review: Portelli & Campbell-Stephens' (2009), "Leading for Equity:The Investing in Diversity Approach. Leadership and Policy in Schools, 10(2), 243-245, DOI: 10.1080/15700763.2010.502611

Ryan, J., Pollock, K., & Antonelli, F. (2009). Teacher diversity in Canada: Leaky pipelines, bottlenecks and glass ceilings.Canadian Journal of Education, 32(3), 512–538.

Pollock, K. (2008). The four pillars of innovation: An elementary school perspective.The Public Sector Innovation Journal, 13(2), 2–20. Retrieved from http://www.innovation.cc/peerreviewed/pollack_innovative2.pdf

Gaskell, J., Kearns, L-L., & Pollock, K. (2008). Approaches to poverty in the Toronto School Board: 1970–2000: No shallow roots.Journal of Comparative Policy Analysis: Research and Practice, 10(4), 427–443. doi: 10.1080/13876980802468907

Pollock, K. (2008). Occasional teachers' work engagement: Professional identity, work-related learning and access to the profession and to daily work [PhD Thesis, University of Toronto]. 

Pollock, K. (2007). Differentiated access to teaching: Teacher recruitment agencies and flexible work arrangements.Canadian and International Education Journal, 36(2), 51–70.

Dibbon, D., & Pollock, K. (2007). The nature of change and innovation in five innovative schools.The Public Sector Innovation Journal, 12(1), 1–13. Retrieved from http://www.innovation.cc/volumes-issues/dibbon_pollock_innovate_school.pdf

Levin, B., Gaskell, J., & Pollock, K. (2007). What shapes inner-city education policy?Canadian Journal of Educational Administration and Policy, 61, 1–22. Retrieved from https://journalhosting.ucalgary.ca/index.php/cjeap/article/view/42742/30602

Pollock, K. (2006). Policy as outcome: Inequities generated from unintended policy outcomes. Canadian and International Education, 35(2), 35–47.

Livingstone, D. W. and Pollock, K. (2004). No room at the top: Underrepresentation and underemployment of highly qualified women and minorities [Paper presentation]. “Maximizing Existing Talent”, Task Force on The Hidden Brain Drain: Women and Minorities as Unrealized Assets, Center for Work-Life Policy, New York. https://wall.oise.utoronto.ca/inequity/1nycms230804.pdf

Professional Journals

Pollock, K. (2022). Leadership trends in Canadian public education. Principal Connections, 25(3).  

Pollock, K., & Dwyer, K. (2021). Research and practice to help guide school leaders during Covid-19. CAP Journal. https://cdnprincipals.com/research-and-practice-to-help-guide-school-leaders-during-covid-19/

Wang, F., & Pollock, K. (2020). L’intensification du travail: Des défis propres aux direction d’écoles francophones.EdCan Magazine

Osmond-Johnson, P., Campbell,C., & Pollock, K. (2020). Moving forward in the COVID-19 era: Reflections for Canadian education.EdCan Magazine

Pollock, K. & Wang, F. (2020). Principal well-being: Strategies and coping mechanisms in times of uncertainty.OPC Register, 22(3) 22-27.

Pollock, K., Hauseman, C., & Wang, F. (2019). How can education systems support principals’ and vice-principal’s well-being?EdCan Magazine.

Pollock, K., Hauseman, C., & Wang, F. (2019). Comment les systèmes d’éducation peuvent-ils favoriser le bien-être des directions d’école?EdCan Magazine.

Pollock, K., Hauseman, C., & Wang, F. (2019). Work intensification: How the role of school leaders is changing.EdCan Magazine.

Pollock, K., Hauseman, C., & Wang, F. (2019). Intensification du travail: L’évolution du rôle des directions d’école.EdCan Magazine.

Wang, F. & Pollock, K. (2019). Francophone principals: What unique challenges do they face?EdCan Magazine.

Wang, F. & Pollock, K. (2019). Quels sont les défis particuliers des directions d’écoles francophones hors Québec (DÉFHQ)?EdCan Magazine.

Lim, L., & Pollock, K. (2018, October). Secondary principal perspectives: How work intensification impacts their vice-principals.  OPC Register, 20(3) 22–26.

Pollock, K. & Edge, K. (2018, February). School Leader Associations: Supporting the well-being and work-life balance of school leaders.OPC Register, 20(1) 22-26.

Pollock, K. (2017, September). Healthy principals, healthy schools: Supporting principals’ well-being.  EdCan Magazine.

Pollock, K. (2017, Automne). Directeurs en santé, écoles en santé: Soutenir le bien-être des directeurs.EdCan Magazine.

Briscoe, P., & Pollock, K. (2017, Spring). Principals’ perceptions of difference and diversity in their student bodies.  CAP Journal, 10–14.

Pollock, K., Wang, F., & Hauseman, C. (2017, October). Vice-principals’ work: More than being an instructional leader.  OPC Register, 19(3), 20–24.

Pollock, K. (with Hauseman, C., & Wang, F.) (2014, October). The changing nature of principals’ work.  OPC Register, 22-26.

Ryan, J., & Pollock, K. (2006). Understanding exclusion in schools. CAP Journal, 14(1), 28–30.

Book Chapters

Pollock, K. (2022). Principals’ work in public schools. In P. Davies & G. Carolyn (Eds.), International encyclopedia of education. Elsevier.

Hauseman, C., Pollock, K., & Wang, F. (2021, in press). Promoting well-being in school principals and vice-principals requires structural change, not just self-care. In B. W. Carpenter, J. Mahfouz, & K. Robinson (Eds.), Supporting leaders for school improvement through self-care and wellbeing. Information Age Publishing.

Pollock, K. (2021). Recursos de liderança pessoal para líderes escolares brasileiros [Personal leadership resources for Brazilian school leaders]. In J. Weinstein & L. Simielli (Eds.),Liderança diretiva escolar. Um fator chave para a transformação da educação. UNESCO.

Pollock, K., & Wang, F. (2021). How principals use their time in Ontario, Canada. In M. Lee, K. Pollock, & P. Tulowitzki (Eds.), How school principals use their time: Implications for school improvement, administration, and leadership. Routledge. 

McWhorter, D., van Roosmalen, E., Kotsopoulos, D., Gadanidis, G., Kane, R., Ng-A-Fook, N., Campbell, C.,  Pollock, K., & Sarfaraz, D. (2019). Fostering improved connections between research, policy, and practice: The knowledge network for applied education research. In J. Malin & C. Brown (Eds.),  The Role of Knowledge Brokers in Education: Connecting the Dots Between Research and Practice. (pp.52-64).  Routledge. DOI: 10.4324/9780429462436

Pollock, K., & Hauseman, D. C. (2019). Management, leadership, and governance in secondary education (Canada). In R. Heydon, M. T. Tatto, & I. Menter (Eds.), Bloomsbury education and childhood Studies. Bloomsbury Academic. DOI: 10.5040/9781474209441.0030

Pollock, K., Walker, A., Swapp, D., & Ben Jaafar, S. (2018). Personal resources for leading schools. In J. Weinstein & G. Muñoz (Eds.), ¿Cómo cultivar el liderazgo educativo? Trece miradas. Centro De Desarrollo De Liderazgo Educativo.

Pollock, K., Campbell, C., McWhorter, D., van Roosmalen, E., & Bairos, K. (2018). Developing a system for knowledge mobilisation: The case of the Knowledge Network for Applied Education Research (KNAER) as a middle tier. In D. Godfrey & C. Brown (Eds.), An eco-system for research-engaged schools: Reforming education through research (22– 40). Routledge. DOI: 10.4324/9780203701027-3

Wang, F., Pollock, K., & Hauseman, D. C. (2018). Ontario principals’ and vice-principals’ well- being and coping strategies in the context of work intensification. In S. Cherkowski & K. Walker (Eds.), Perspectives on flourishing schools (pp. 287–304). Lexington Books. 

Carr-Harris, S., Bairos, K., Campbell, C., & Pollock, K. (2018). Developing a knowledge mobilization network across education systems: Mobilizing knowledge in the Ontario education system. In M. A. Barwick (Ed.), The knowledge translations professional certificate (KTPC) casebook: Building KT friendly organizations in healthcare and beyond (pp. 38–45). The Hospital for Sick Children. Retrieved from: https://www.sickkids.ca/Learning/AbouttheInstitute/Programs/Knowledge-Translation/Resources/Resources.html

Pollock, K., Wang, F., & Hauseman, C. (2017, January). Complexity and volume: An inquiry into factors that drive principals’ work. In K. Leithwood, J. Sun, & K. Pollock (Eds.), How school leaders contribute to student success: The four paths framework (pp. 209–238) . Springer. doi: 10.1007/978-3-319-50980-8_10

Gonyou-Brown, J., & Pollock, K. (2017, June). Supporting new teachers on the road of teaching: The role of the elementary school principal. In B. Kutsyuruba & K. Walker (Eds.), The bliss and blisters of early career teaching (pp. 441–459). Word & Deed Publishing Incorporated.

Pollock, K., & Hauseman, D. C. (2016). Observational research on school principals: To time or not or not to time. In L. Ling & P. Ling (Eds.), Paradigms and methods in educational research (pp. 88–107). IGI Global. doi: 10.4018/978-1-5225-1738-2.ch006

Winton, S., & Pollock, K. (2015). How can educational leaders contend with the political aspects of their role? In D. Griffiths, & J. Portelli (Eds.), Key questions for educational leaders (pp. 261–266). Word & Deeds and Edphil Books.

Pollock, K. (2015). The new “new teacher.” In N. Maynes & B. E. Hatt. (Eds.) The complexity of hiring, supporting, and retaining new teachers in Canada (pp. 91–112). Canadian Association for Teacher Education/Association canadienne pour la formation a l'enseignement.

Pollock, K., & Hauseman, D. C. (2015). Principal leadership in Canada. In H. Arlestig, C. Day, & O. Johansson (Eds.), A decade of research on school principals: Cases from 24 countries (pp. 202–232). Springer International Publishing. doi: 10.1007/978-3-319-23027-6_11

Pollock, K., & Winton, S. (2013). Innovation in graduate education: Dealing with the “front end” of a transborder hybrid course collaboration. In K. Goodnough, G. Galway, C. Badenhorst, & R. Kelly (Eds.), Inspiration and innovation in teaching and teacher education (pp. 147–163). Lexington Books.

Pollock, K. (2012). Occasional teachers’ job-related learning. In R. Clark, D. W. Livingstone, & H. Smaller (Eds.), Teacher learning and power in the knowledge society (pp. 109–125). Sense Publishing. doi: 10.1007/978-94-6091-973-2_6

Pollock, K. (2009). Transitioning to the teacher workforce: Internationally educated teachers (IETs) as occasional teachers. In P. Sawchuck & A. Taylor (Eds.), Challenging transitions in learning and work: Reflections on policy and practice (pp. 165–182). Sense Publishing. doi: 10.1163/9789087908898

Reports

School principals' work and well-being in Ontario and British Columbia 
Pollock, K.,
& Wang, F. (2020). School principals’ work and well-being in Ontario: What they say and why it matters. SSHRC.

Wang, F., & Pollock, K. (2020). School principals’ work and well-being in British Columbia: What they say and why it matters. SSHRC.

Feedback Report: Improving Communications Between Parents and Schools: A Collaboration Between the Behavioural Insights Team
Pollock, K. (2019). Feedback report onImproving Communications Between Parents and Schools: A Collaboration Between the Behavioural Insights Team, EasyPeasy, and Suffolk City Council.” Unpublished internal document.

Principals’ work in Ontario’s French-language education systems
Pollock, K., & Wang, F. (2019). Le travail des directions d’école au sein des systems d’éducation de langue française en Ontario [Principals’ work in Ontario’s French-language education systems]. Report prepared for the Association des directions et directions adjointes des écoles franco-ontariennes (ADFO).

KNAER Secretariat joint final report
Campbell, C., Pollock, K., Bairos, K., Tooker, V., & Phuong, M. (2019). KNAER Secretariat joint final report: A summary of key deliverables, activities and impact. OISE/UT and Western University.

Updates and revisions to the Ontario Leadership Framework.
Pollock, K., et al. (2018). Updates and revisions to the Ontario Leadership Framework. (pp 277.). Unpublished. Toronto, ON: Ontario Ministry of Education.


Principal Work–Life Balance and Well-being Matters

In 2016, I and Dr. Karen Edge co-facilitated the Ontario Principals’ Council (OPC) Third International Symposium on Principal Work–Life Balance and Well-being. This White Paper, Principal Work–Life Balance and Well-being Matters (PDF), was commissioned by the OPC and International School Leadership (ISL) to report on the symposium. The report details the insights of presenters and participants who attended the Third International Symposium in November 2016, and describes the work of the broader global research community on leadership well-being and work–life balance. This document is intended to promote discussion among policy-makers and system and school leaders, and to support the work of professional associations.

This work may be cited as: Ontario Principals’ Council. (2017). International Symposium White Paper: Principal work–life balance and well-being matters. Toronto, ON.

The Replacements - Non-permanent Teachers (PDF)

Occasional Teachers' Access to Professional Learning (PDF)

Suspension and expulsion program evaluation: Final report.
Pollock, K., Faubert, B., Hauseman, C., & Bakker, P. (2017). Suspension and expulsion program evaluation: Final report. (128 pp.). Unpublished. Toronto, ON: Ontario Ministry of Education.

The changing nature of vice principals’ work. Final report for the Ontario Principals’ Council.
Pollock, K., & Wang, F., & Hauseman, D. C. (2017, June). The changing nature of vice principals’ work. Final report for the Ontario Principals’ Council. (54 pp.). Toronto, ON: Ontario Principals’ Council.

KNAER final report.
Campbell, C., Pollock, K., Carr-Harris, S., & Briscoe, P. (2014, October). KNAER final report. (123 pp.). Toronto, ON: Ontario Ministry of Education

The changing nature of principals’ work. Final report for the Ontario Principals’ Council.
Pollock, K., & Wang, F., & Hauseman, D. C. (2014, August). The changing nature of principals’ work. Final report for the Ontario Principals’ Council. (41 pp.). Toronto, ON: Ontario Principals’ Council. (As of November 19, 2017: Approximately 1560 downloads in 15 different countries, 1 newspaper interview, 2 radio interviews)

Occasional teachers’ access to professional learning: Final report for the Durham Occasional Teacher Local
Pollock, K., & Bairos, K. (2011). Occasional teachers’ access to professional learning: Final report for the Durham Occasional Teacher Local (74 pp. + 25 pp. instrument appendix). Oshawa, ON: Durham Occasional Teacher Local.

Occasional teachers’ access to professional learning: Final report for the Peel Elementary Occasional Teacher Local
Pollock, K., & Bairos, K. (2011). Occasional teachers’ access to professional learning: Final report for the Peel Elementary Occasional Teacher Local (67 pp. + 25 pp. instrument appendix). Mississauga, ON: Peel Elementary Occasional Teacher Local.

Occasional teachers’ access to professional learning: Final report for the Elementary Teachers’ Federation of Ontario, Provincial Office.
Pollock, K. (2010). Occasional teachers’ access to professional learning: Final report for the Elementary Teachers’ Federation of Ontario, Provincial Office. (121 pp. + 2 pp. & 25 pp. instrument appendix). Ontario: Elementary Teachers’ Federation of Ontario.

The MIRROR Report: An Evaluation.
Brown, J., & Pollock, K. (2002). The MIRROR Report: An Evaluation. STEM~net, Memorial University, St. John’s, NL.

Teaching and Supervision

Teaching

Graduate Courses:

9711 – Qualitative Research in Education

9200 – Social Context of Education

9688 – Special Topics Course in Educational Leadership

9600 – Ontario Educational Policy in a Global Context

9507 – Graduate Seminar in School Leadership

9500 – Power, Politics, and Policy in Education: Historical and Contemporary Perspectives

9678 – Diverse Traditions: Approaches to Educational Leadership

Independent Reading and Research Courses

Nielsen, R. (2018) Leadership in Canada’s Northern public schools

Morgan, M. (2014). Secondary school principals’ leadership tensions.

Sattler, P. (2012). Post-secondary education and workforce development.

Nywening, B. (2012). The Ontario Secondary School Literacy Test and English teachers’ work.

Dencev, H. (2011). Sense of place in the differentiated instruction and assessment classroom.

Sattler, P. (2010). Education governance in Finland.

Anderson, K. (2009). Investigating student success among children in foster care settings.

Stubbs, A. (2009). Cultural capital beyond the classroom: First generation university students and consequences of career capital.

Taylor, A. (2008). Gender issues in distance learning

Undergraduate

EDUC 5499 – Occasional Teacher Preparation

E73 – Social Foundations of Education

Supervision - Ph.D.

In Progress

Mairaj, B. (In progress). How principals support refugee students in public schools in Ontario.

Adu-Bobi, A. (In progress). Well-being and self-care of K-12 school principals in a pandemic.

Al-Sabbagh, S. (In progress). The underrepresentation of minorities in
school leadership positions.

Choudhary, A. (In progress). Promoting inclusive school leadership:The work and well-being of Islamic school principals in Ontario.

Nielsen, R. (In progress). Ontario principals' understanding and promotion of equity in virtual schooling.

Omar, N. (In progress). Leading schools with community aspirations.

Singh, S. (In progress). Leadership for social justice: Lessons from three community schools in Nepal, a multiple case study.

Ebied, R. (In progress). Ontario principals’ support for Syrian refugee students: Cultivating compassionate schools.

Mahammad, K. (In progress). Islamic school principals’ approach to student mental health in Ontario.

 

Complete

Swapp, D. (2022). School principals’ work in Granada. 

Walker, A. (2021). Jamaican secondary school principals’ occupational mental health and well-being

Ahmed, A. (2016). Exploring the Experiences of Muslim Students in an Urban Ontario Public School

Mindzak, M. (2016). Exploring the Working-Lives of Unemployed and Underemployed Teachers in Ontario

Supervision - Ed.D.

Supervison - MA

Complete

Ogunbanwo, O. (In progress). Educators Working in High-Poverty
Schools After COVID-19.

Nielsen, R. (2020). Negotiating Access for Collaborative Inquiry into Yukon Educational Leadership: An autoethnography (Master of Education Master’s Research Paper, Critical Policy, Equity, and Leadership Studies). UWO

Scott, C. (2013). The transition of newcomer youth in Ontario educational policy: A discourse analysis (Master of Education thesis, Education Policy Studies). UWO.

Pearce, J. (2012). Volunteering in schools by newly certified, unemployed teachers: Sites of work and learning. (Master of Education thesis, Education Policy Studies). UWO.

Swapp, D. (2012). Exploring a school principal’s work in contemporary times. (Master of Education thesis, Education Policy Studies). UWO.

Chalikakis, A. (2012). Occasional teachers' identities while completing daily supply and long-term occasional work. (Master of Education thesis, Education Policy Studies). UWO.

Bendheim, J. (2011). The classroom setting and how it influences occasional teachers’ work. (Master of Education thesis, Education Policy Studies). UWO.

Hinschberger, B. (2011). The principals’ role in classroom assessment practices. (Master of Education thesis, Education Policy Studies). UWO.

Stubbs, A. (2011). Out of place. (Master of Education thesis, Education Policy Studies). UWO.

Higginbottom, K. (2010). What can educational leaders learn from Oprah Winfrey’s ability to persuade (Master’s thesis, Education Policy Studies). UWO.

Moir, W. (2010 ). Student engagement and retention in Ontario’s university system. (Master of Education thesis, Education Policy Studies). UWO.

Tuters, S. (2009). Investigating teachers’ understanding and responses to diversity in a rural Ontario classroom. (Master of Education thesis, Education Policy Studies). UWO.

Student Awards

Swapp, D. (2022) Cecille DePass Dissertation Award, Farquharson Institute of Public Affairs

  • *Awarded to candidates who conduct research on groups and communities who are rarely investigated. 

Nielsen, R. (2021) Dr. Allen Pearson Graduate Award in Educational Leadership, Western University

  • *Awarded to a full time graduate student in Education, based on academic achievement and a letter outlining how the student’s studies align with the development of research in the area of Educational Leadership, and the student’s aspirations for having an impact on leadership in Education 

Nielsen, R. (2019) Dr. Allen Pearson Graduate Award in Educational Leadership, Western University

  • *Awarded to a full time graduate student in Education, based on academic achievement and a letter outlining how the student’s studies align with the development of research in the area of Educational Leadership, and the student’s aspirations for having an impact on leadership in Education

Swapp, D. (2014) Robert MacMillan Graduate Award in Educational Leadership, Western University

  • * Awarded to a full-time student working on a thesis at the master’s or doctoral level in Educational Leadership who overcame adversity, and through demonstrated compassion and service, contributed to the larger community. Received award in its inaugural year

Swapp, D. (Fall 2012) Exploring a school principal’s work in contemporary times.

  • * Winner of the W. A. Townshend Gold Medal in Education 2012

Chalikakis, A. (Spring 2012) Occasional teachers' identities while completing daily supply and long-term occasional work.

  • * Winner of the W. A. Townshend Gold Medal in Education 2012

Anderson, Kerry. (2011) Students living in foster care and the “learning to 18 Initiative.”

  • * Winner of the Jessica Jean Campbell Couslon Award, Centre for Inclusive Education Centre, Faculty of Education, Western.

Other

 

Infographics

Organizations

The Knowledge Network for Applied Education Research (KNAER)

Centre for Leadership and Diversity

The International Successful School Principalship Project (ISSPP)

Podcasts

Downtime for Principals?

Reports

The Replacements - Non-permanent Teachers

Occasional Teachers' Access to Professional Learning

Videos

Do Teachers Have It Easy? A roundtable discussion with educators – Well at Work Awareness Video #5

Work Intensification: How the Role of School Leaders is Changing

What is a ‘systems approach’ to staff well-being in K-12 education?

Webinars

Curious Convos: Dr. Katina Pollock & Dr. Amanda Heffernan discuss Principal Wellbeing during COVID-19

Moving Forward in the COVID-19 Era: Reflections for Canadian Education

Moving Forward in the COVID-19 Era: Reflections for Canadian Education – PANEL DISCUSSION

Blogs

Pollock, K. (2021, March 1). Professional capital and systems approaches. LinkedIn.
https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/professional-capital-systems-approaches-katina-pollock/
 
Pollock, K. (2020, November 4). Principal well-being and the pandemic. LinkedIn.
https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/principal-well-being-pandemic-katina-pollock/?trackingId=GN7DUPu6SXuPKaaIAO1ZEw%3D%3D

Pollock, K., Campbell, C., Bairos, K., & Carr-Harris, S. (2016, Dec. 28). KNAER: Have we practiced what we’ve preached? Knowledge Network for Applied Education Research. https://www.knaer-recrae.ca/index.php/knowledge-hub/kmb-blog/9-tips-from-the-experts/187-knaer-have-we-practiced-what-we-ve-preached