Recent Publications

Dr. Barbara Fenesi on the positive link between physical activity and and academic achievment

Using data from 31,124 elementary and secondary school students across Ontario, we found that elementary students engaging in 7 days/week of physical activity had highest academic achievement, and secondary students engaging in at least 3-4 days/week had highest academic achievement. Interesting, these benefits occurred through reductions in attention and hyperactivity.

MA student Katie Hart assesses the support needs of caregivers of children with Down Syndrome

The study addressed the gap in the research field specific to assessing the support needs of caregivers of children with Down Syndrome (DS). Individual interviews with caregivers of children with DS were conducted and Concept Mapping analysis was employed generating eight thematic concept maps. Recommendations were provided to community services.

Dr. Isha DeCoito on the benefits of developing digital scientific timelines

Findings of this study indicate beneficial effects of developing digital scientific timelines including flexibility in achieving a variety of learning goals (including multi-scale analyses, visualizing different spatial and temporal arrangements, developing historical contexts, etc.), flexibility in application and actualization, and enhanced motivation and engagement.

Dr. Barbara Fenesi on the pros and cons of virtual reality anatomy instruction

This study demonstrated that learning anatomy using virtual reality models compared to standard physical models was detrimental to learning for those with lower visuospatial ability. This work underscores the need for more evidence-based research evaluating virtual reality anatomy instruction prior to widespread uptake in an increasingly technology-oriented education culture.

Dr. Anton Puvirajah on how a summer youth program supports self-perceived communication competence

Informed by previous qualitative research that revealed the importance of learner’s communication competence as a key focus and driver to gaining confidence, understanding, and supporting their STEM identification, the research drew on a survey strategy to examine the extent to which the summer youth program supported participants’ self-perceived communication competence.

Dr. Isha DeCoito uses digital scientific timelines and a video game to address several key nature of science targets

The author addresses several key nature of science targets (e.g., shared methods, law/theory distinction, tentative, durable, and self-correcting, limitations of science, creativity, subjectivity, and social and cultural influences) through digital scientific timelines and a digital video game.

Dr. Lynn Dare on the experience of students who skipped a grade

In this phenomenological study, we describe the experiences of young people between 17 and 28 years of age, who skipped a grade in Canadian schools. Participants shared their attitudes towards grade-based acceleration and offered their insights on factors to consider when deciding on acceleration.

Dr. Isha DeCoito on digital video games as a learning environment

The authors discuss the use of digital video games (DVGs) as a learning environment; one that engages learners through technology, provides opportunity for creative output, and promotes the intrinsic motivation for learning necessary to advance the development of twenty-first century skills and interaction with STEM content.

Dr. Nicole Neil compares methocs for teaching children with autism spectrum disorders to label objects

This study compared two methods for teaching children with autism spectrum disorders to label objects during behavioural intervention; The use of "what is it?" compared to presentation of the object alone. Children learned to label objects using both methods and demonstrated the skill during play.

PhD student Lisa-Marie Gagliardi conducts a detailed overview of inquiry-based curriculum in early childhood education

Dr. Melody Viczko's invited chapter about how national organizations influence internationalization policies in Canadian higher education

In this book chapter, I was invited to write about national organizations that influence internationalization policies in Canadian higher education. Using research I conducted with digital methods, I examine the politics of universities' engagement with Mitacs, Universities Canada and an emerging innovation hub involved in the federal Innovation Superclusters Initiative. This book was recognized by the Canadian Bureau of International Education (CBIE) for bringing cutting-edge knowledge to the field of international education and the editors of the book (Tamtik, Trilokekar and Jones) received the Catalyst Award 2020 (https://cbie.ca/what-we-do/cbie-excellence-awards/2020-recipients/). https://cbie.ca/what-we-do/cbie-excellence-awards/2020-recipients/

Dr. Katina Pollock on how COVID-19 has changed school leaders' work

This edition of International Studies in Education Administration focuses on worldwide responses to the pandemic. In my article, I argue that school leaders' work has changed within the context of COVID-19 and that their work now has two prongs: (1) safe schooling and future schooling and (2) digital instructional leadership.

Dr. Pejman Habibie's edited the new book "Novice Writers and Scholarly Publication"

Drawing on the perspectives and experiences of authors, supervisors, reviewers, and editors, this book seeks to present a rich and nuanced picture of the practices and challenges faced by both Anglophone and English as an additional language (EAL) junior scholars in writing for publication.

PhD student Sarah Hennessy talks about Idea Station

Idea Station, the student portion of a research project to revitalize one urban Canadian school’s outdated playground helps to re-envision new approaches to education, environment and climate change, shifting the education ‘of children’ in favour of learning ‘with children’ – a shift that mirrors the language of common world pedagogies.

MA student Amira Hmidan examins how gender, sociosexuality and erotophilia influence sexual dreams

The study examined how gender, sociosexuality and erotophilia influenced sexual dreams. Men scored higher on sociosexuality and sex dream valence than women. Individuals who scored higher on sociosexuality and erotophilia reported experiencing more frequent sex dreams and evaluated them more positively. Additionally, erotophilia and sociosexuality significantly predicted sex dream valence.

PhD Student Shannon McKechnie presents her findings from her MA research with student affairs and services practitioners in higher education

In this article I present findings from my MA research with student affairs and services practitioners in higher education. I examine the issue of skills development and student employability through policy discourses and student affairs programs and services in the university.

PhD student Sarah Hennessy explores pedagogies of indeterminacy

What might pedagogies of indeterminacy do? As researchers and educators, we ask that question, inspired by common worlds pedagogies, exploring pedagogies of indeterminacy. Drawing on pedagogical inquiries using charcoal and cardboard in an early childhood centre we challenge dominant neoliberal constructs of productivity in early childhood education.

Dr. Gus Riveros advances the scope of research methods in educational administration and leadership

In this conceptual paper, we propose that a theorization of space can advance the scope of research methods in educational administration and leadership. We argue for the incorporation of the notion of ‘spatial justice’ to the research, analysis, and practice of educational administration and leadership in educational organizations and communities.

Dr. Karen Bax helps families living with epilepsy build resilience

This article describes the study protocol of a randomized control trial delivering a live online program intervention, Making Mindfulness Matter, (M3) to children living with epilepsy and their parents. M3 teaches mindful awareness, the neuropsychology of emotion and the benefits of positive psychology to help build resilience within the family.

Kelly-Ann MacAlpine studies how human and non-human relationships affect the development of children

With particular attention to early childhood education, my area of interest focuses on exploring how complicated human and non-human relationships affect how children develop an emerging understanding of the world around. This article explores the interplay of alternative perspectives in a critical look at Ontario, Canada’s newly released policy document Growing Success, The Kindergarten Addendum: Assessment, Evaluation, and Reporting in Ontario Schools (Ontario Ministry of Education, 2016).

Wei Wei explores the introduction of professional standards for principals in China

I am a PhD candidate in the Critical Policy, Equity, and Leadership Studies stream. Using policy borrowing as an analytical framework, this study explores the introduction of the Professional Standards for Principals (Ministry of Education of the PRC, 2013) in China. Internationally, this study elaborates on the global leadership discourses that are evident in both leadership standards across jurisdictions and documents from international organizations. Nationally, it illustrates the ways in which the Chinese leadership standards have responded to this global policy convergence based on its local contexts.

Claire Crooks examines the effectiveness of culturally-relevant programming for Indigenous youth

Although there is increasing interest in strength-based, culturally relevant programming for Indigenous youth, there are relatively few published evaluations. In this study my team followed an entire cohort of Indigenous students for a two year period and conducted surveys and interviews and collected official school data. Our results showed that youth who participated in two years of our culturally-relevant mentoring program reported improved positive mental health, increased cultural connectedness, and better credit accumulation compared to their peers. This study demonstrated the effectiveness of culturally-relevant programming social, emotional and academic outcomes.

Veronica Pacini-Ketchabaw investigates common world relations of children with places, materials and other species

My current research, within the Common World Childhoods Research Collective, traces the common world relations of children with places, materials, and other species. I currently direct two SSHRC-funded projects: SSHRC Insight - Transforming Waste Pedagogies in Early Childhood Education (2017-2021) and SSHRC PDG - Exploring Climate Change Pedagogies with Children (2017-2021).